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Launched in MayXxx chat online man 37 Bristol 37 glossy quarterly specialising in the 50s and 60s eras. From his early BL days at Poole in through his many years of loyal service to Wolverhampton, the former American star recalls the highs and lows of his spectacular career, on and off the track. Read why the Californian admits he was "lucky" to finally win the World Championship inwhere he thinks his main rival Hans Nielsen made a big mistake. Why 'Sudden' Sam wishes he could turn back the clock and do things differently at the Bradford World Final and why being "too eager to please others" ultimately cost him more individual glory.

The terrible injuries that nearly killed him, his role in Wolves' most successful era and what he might do next now that he has quit racing. Alan talks about the controversial incident with Chris Morton that left him with a broken leg.

He also reveals his uplifting battle to conquer Hodgkins Disease and his courageous return to enjoy yet more success with Cradley Heathens. Andy reflects on the British Final, the greatest night of his career when he and his elder brother dominated the plum Coventry meeting. We also catch up with youngest brother John and find out what all the Grahames are doing today. Graham looks back at his racing days with Ellesmere Port, Crewe, Hull and Long Eaton and why his court case against Oxford won him a hefty pay-out and led to a new career.

Also, why John Berry doesn't feature on Graham's Christmas card list And why it went wrong for him in his one season with Sheffield. Mike gave Swindon many years loyal service but he reveals why his well-earned testimonial turned out to be a wash-out in more ways than one. Go on, turn back the clock and relive the 'good, old days'.

Editor Tony McDonald visited the Kent home of DJ to find out how he now views those massive blows and much more from the former England international whose glittering career took in Eastbourne, Wembley, Leicester, Reading, two spells with King's Lynn, Wimbledon and finally Mildenhall. Wee Dave looks back candidly at the highs and lows of his year career. He explains why he got the nickname 'Cardigan Man', why he was never seen in the bar after meetings and why he regretted to doing his Lynn team-mate Michael Lee a 'favour' on the way to the World Final.

Dave also has plenty of forthright and controversial things to say about his three years as manager of the England team at the start of this decade. He reveals why he had no choice but to lie to the crowd over one rider's non-appearance in a Test match and his revelations about other problems he had to contend with behind the scenes make compelling reading. Our top columnist John Berry also provides his personal insight into the speedway star who might also have made it to the top in golf.

Peter relives the horror of the freak leg injury that almost ruled him out of the Gothenburg final and possibly cost him his second successive world crown. We look at others who took bravery to another level. He reveals why, after a visit with Berwick, he never wanted to go back to Middlesbrough, how he came to wear those distinctive dazzling leathers with arm tassels and the thrill of making it to the World Final in He also recalls what Aussie fans threw at the touring British Lions! Now back at Arlington as team manager, the former Oxford and Reading middle order man also names his greatest team-mate.

We reflect on the good, the bad and the average at the little London Road track in Kent. We were there to take a sneak preview. Maybe 'Crash' put his finger on why he was not always considered right up there with the very best of the 70s track heroes when he described himself as Xxx chat online man 37 Bristol 37 easy-going. He looks back too at his three successful years at Exeter - a track he was at first loathe to - and, ultimately, the acrimony that led to him leaving his beloved Blunsdon for one final championship-winning season with Reading in And, of course, the Marlborough marvel also recalls the pinnacle of his international career.

Backtrack tracked the former Coventry, Reading and Swindon star down at his home in Queensland, Australia and chewed the fat with a fiery personality who had a lot to get off his chest. We could start with his confessions of how Coventry bent the rules to stay within the points limit and how his Danish team-mates and their mechanics 'shuffled' their back wheels to get a vital edge on their tyres and the opposition.

Shirra tells what it was like having mighty Ivan Mauger and Ole Olsen as team-mates for club and country. He reveals how he was 'hounded' by the authorities after failing a drugs test and then refusing to 'throw' a major World Championship race. In the end he was given two season-long bans from the sport, but still came back fighting and was riding in veterans' races in Oz only last year! Well, as out exclusive interview with him reveals, he is now working as a fully-qualified diving instructor.

Our readers also have their say on what they feel has gone wrong with the sport and the reasons why many have left, never to return. But when injury struck, this extraordinary man turned his attention to boats. Is your favourite among them? An inspirational interview with a special man. Forrester, Leadbitter, Wilcock, Dixon, Havvy. Get those brain cells dusted off and launch into our second quiz competition to test your knowledge. Who knows, you could win free tickets to the British GP at Cardiff. Erik, a one-club Cradley Heath legend, gave us his most candid and heart-warming interview ever.

The fast-starting former Robins flier, the Wiltshire town's best-ever speedway product, hits back at those who questioned his trapping technique. He explains his reluctance to move from Swindon to Exeter, and why it turned out for the best, and then his dislike of Ivan Mauger that led him to leave the County Ground for Oxford. He ended his career back at Blunsdon and Bob names his all-time Swindon Top 7.

Now 63, he also talks candidly about his serious health battles, which have included three heart operations and a stroke. Glasgow legend Jimmy admits that, in the interests of his career, he should have moved south earlier than he did when he became Hull's first BL No. Jim, who is now technical steward for the British GP and plays a key role in the Coventry pits on race nights, also gives his assessment of all four Glasgow home tracks on which he has led the Tigers.

PETE SMITH Another loyal, one-track man, Pete Smith was part of the furniture at Poole throughout the 70s, when he celebrated a well-earned testimonial before retiring to run the thriving family car business he still has today. We talk to 'Pirate Pete', Poole's first championship-winning skipper, about his career at Wimborne Road and the fellow stars he appeared alongside on the south coast, including hard men like Reidar Eide and John Langfield who he once punched in the pits and stylish Malcolm Simmons, who succeeded him as the club's top man.

A World Team Cup finalist inRichard also made it to the big one inbut he admits now that he didn't invest enough in his machinery before the Bradford World Final. They are just a couple of labels attached to Czech star Zdenek, a former daredevil who rode in Britain for Exeter and Birmingham before his tragic death in Zdenek's widow, Jirina, provides an interesting insight into the caring husband she lost and the multi-talented tracksport star known in his homeland as 'Demon', while fellow Czech legend Vaclav Verner adds his views.

Editor Tony Mac recently visited the original Great Dane at his home in Denmark and the result is a captivating 8- interview with the man who put Danish speedway on the map. As forthright and controversial as ever, Ole talks about his own illustrious racing career, including his memories of riding for Newcastle, Wolverhampton and Coventry in the British League.

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And what did he call Ian Thomas that so incensed the Vikings' boss? Our top writer John Berry airs his own personal thoughts on Olsen, the man who became his most difficult opponent when they managed England and Denmark respectively in the mids. All this and much more The second instalment of the interview, when Ole talks candidly about his feud with Hans Nielsen, explains why he backed Erik Gundersen and how that, in turn, also upset Tommy Knudsen, will be in our next issue No. But, as Erik warns here, it's not only the progression of bike-mad kids in Denmark and Sweden who Britain should beware of.

He predicts that Russia will follow Poland and become a major force in world speedway in the seasons ahead, having himself been offered a coaching role in the old Soviet Union. The former Cradley Heath hero also offers to help Britain puts its house in order after years of neglect when it comes to youth development. Booey also pays tribute to the late Allan Morrey, one of the unsung heroes of Belle Vie Speedway for many years. JOE THURLEY Although currently awaiting triple heart bypass surgery that he hopes will happen in April, the former Birmingham boss reveals the highs and lows of reviving the Brummies at Perry Barr inthe glory days of the mids and then his ill-fated decision to take them up into the top flight.

It's a gamble he now regrets. In trying to pinpoint some of the main problems behind England's demise as a world force in speedway, twice World Cup-winner Davis - who now manages GB international Lee Richardson - also questions the attitude of the Brits themselves. He says: "There is a worrying tendency for every new, young British rider to have their name emblazoned on the side of their van before they have even made their name in speedway. You would think they would be too embarrassed to do it.

He talks controversially about his turbulent England career and admits "there was a north-south divide in the national team set-up. It's another thoroughly compelling interview in the magazine that always gets to the heart of the matter. OLE OLSEN - Part Two Speedway's most powerful figure raised more than a few eyebrows with his opinions and suggested remedies for British speedway in our last issue, and the Speedway Grand Prix Race Director is back in the second and final part of Tony Mac's exclusive Xxx chat online man 37 Bristol 37 with more controversial views that are bound to captivate readers.

Ole told Xxx chat online man 37 Bristol 37 "I did more for Hans Nielsen than anybody has ever done for him. Hans wanted to beat Erik just to prove to me that he was the better rider. Our latest seven- feature on Olsen includes brand new colour photographs of Ole at home in Denmark with his family. Larry recalls his country's finest hour, when they became world team champions in He explains why he quit the UK scene so young. Taking a comprehensive, if curious, look back at this friendly North-East venue where the bikes haven't roared sincebut where a neat little stadium just made for modern speedway still exists.

Posing for our photographer with the Lynn Trophy he won in the first-ever meeting staged at KL in'Bettsy' talks of his respect and affection for Maurice Littlechild - the man who tempted him out of retirement. He also pays tribute to the other man who set him on the path to domestic and international stardom, his great friend Colin Pratt, who made Terry realise that he needed a much more professional approach if he was ever to fulfil his potential. Betts often fought a lone battle as Lynn's spearhead, until the arrival of Malcolm Simmons in Terry talks about their rivalry and how it led to him breaking his arm in a second-half final.

He reflects, too, on the sudden emergence of Michael Lee and then, at the end ofhis unhappy departure from his beloved Saddlebow Road, where he found himself out in the cold after the ing of Dave Jessup. Neil reveals how he masterminded the Jawa conversion that took the sport by storm in and why he wasn't able to sustain its initial success as rival companies, Weslake and Jawa, unveiled their motors. One of speedway's most respected and enduring characters, 'Streetie' looks back on the latter days of his own long racing career with Newport and his defence of the much-maligned Somerton Park track also makes very interesting reading.

Neil also explains the satisfaction he gained from nurturing the careers of his son-in-law Phil Crump and grandson, British GP winner Jason Crump. Also, he reveals what he remembers most from New Zealand's World Team Cup victory and chills out while recalling his ice racing exploits.

He recalls how the death of a former team-mate and career-ending injuries to another good friend hastened his decision to quit. WAGS Behind every successful man. Les laments going so close to winning the World title at Los Angeles in and offers his own take on that infamous Penhall-Carter scrap that ultimately cost him the crown. Phil talks to us from his home in California, where he settled after suddenly quitting British speedway at the end of the season.

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Read what he has to say about his time with Ellesmere Port and Cradley Heath and why he decided to give Britain the boot. Neilwho holds the all-time British appearance record after an incredible?? Find out too why he was never best mates with Kenny Carter! Stevethe youngest Collins, talks in-depth for the first time about his struggle to follow in the tyre tracks of his more illustrious brothers.

And Peterthe World Champion they all set out to try and emulate, provides a fascinating insight into the characteristics of all four of his brothers. REUNIONS We're at Belle Vue and Wolverhampton to bring you exclusive coverage of their recent 80 th anniversary meetings, while we also catch up with the Rayleigh reunions to celebrate the 60 th anniversary of the Rockets' launch and their revival 40 years ago. We re-visit the Essex town to find out why they attracted regular 5, crowds and what was so 'different' about their so-called safety fence.

In our new in-depth, six- exclusive interview with the former Wolverhampton and Hackney favourite, he candidly admits: "My downfall, and it was always my problem as a rider, is that I never had the ambition or desire in me to become World Champion. There was always a little something missing.

Andy told Backtrack : "I took out a Polish licence because I had no choice. I had to work. Pat, who is now retired, says: "I've missed the day-to-day running of the Racers and the people, but not the politics of the sport. Looking back, Rudy admits: "Some people told me I was too nice to be a speedway rider.

I think I was fair and didn't do anything bad to anyone. Maybe, if I had my time again, I would try to be a bit tougher.

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Martin Neal talks to Ken Marshall about how he, partner Will Hunter and other far-sighted enthusiasts helped to make some dreams come true at Felton. Just minutes later, Briggo's title dreams lie in tatters. For the first time since his ordeal 36 years ago, the four times World Champion talks candidly and in great depth about the incident that he believes robbed him of a fifth crown.

BB has never forgiven Bernt Persson, the Swede he accuses of knocking him off on the first bend, but with the refreshing honest that runs throughout our exclusive interview, he admits: "When I look back at the TV replay of the incident, I can see that I wasn't smart. I left Persson too much room. He talks about his rivalry and friendship with Ivan Mauger, on and off the track. To complement our major, eight- interview with the biggest personality speedway has ever known, our top columnist JOHN BERRY also takes a close look at the massive impact Briggs made on the sport. JB recalls the time Briggo revealed how he had pumped oxygen pumped into his blood to help keep him fit and feeling younger than ever.

He pays tribute to a few of the promoters he rode for and explains why leaving Leicester in proved a good move for all concerned. A reputable engine tuner, John admits that perhaps doing all the work on his bikes backfired on him and stopped him achieving greater success. The little man with the big heart recalls team-mates such as Terry Betts, Michael Lee and the people who helped him to become an unsung hero at Saddlebow Road. The World Finalist and former England international quit at the end of and he explains why - plagued by persistent problems with his shoulder - he had no thoughts of dropping into Division Two.

Anders Michanek pictured left with John Davis and Jan Andersson are certainly in there, of course, but who else s them in our colourful four- tribute.

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Definitely cause for debate among former Tilehurst and Smallmead devotees. We've also got colour pictures of former Racers as they look now - taken at the End of Era finale in October. BLRCs of the 80s Following on from our look at British League Riders' Championships of the 70s in our last issue, we fast-forward to the 80s decade and review the Belle Vue biggie that saw Englishmen and Danes dominate this annual classic before it passed into American hands.

He was one of the most forceful riders of his era whose robust riding style divided opinion. Preben Eriksen talks about his 'hard man' tag and recalls some of the explosive incidents that brought the Danish World Team Cup winner unwelcome headlines during his eventful spells with Ipswich and Wolverhampton. In this exclusive, Eriksen told Backtrack: "I was never a dirty rider. I never did anything to anyone deliberately. Sometimes I was a bit too ambitious and I tried a bit too hard, but I never went out to push someone out of the way.

Read what the former Ipswich boss thinks about one of his few overseas imports.

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